CRYPTO: GAFA doubles down on a crypto future, whilst regulators bite down on a crypto past

via autonomous.com

A few things here. Firstly, this week at its Worldwide Developer Conference Apple announced the launch of a mightily powerful computer deemed “the cheese grater”, a monitor stand costing as much as an iPhone X…just for the stand, and more importantly CryptoKit . Essentially, CryptoKit is a cryptographic developer tool that allows developers to build more security functionality into their apps with improved support and ease-of-use. Such functionality comes in the form of hashing, public and private key generation, and encryption needed to be integrated into iOS applications. Not to be confused with Samsung and HTC’s phones that come with native crypto wallets. Yet, it goes without question that these companies (Apple now included) are reacting to the rising demand for crypto-focused products.

This is not the first time we are seeing the tech giant embrace crypto either. Last month it was announced that debit card and payment app ‘Spend’ – which supports over 16 different cryptocurrencies – now has integrated Apple Pay functionality. How this works is cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin or Dash that have been bought in / sent to the integrated wallet, will get converted at the point-of-sale for instant purchases through the ApplePay network.

Another GAFA giant we know is embracing crypto is none other than Facebook with their soon-to-be-launched cryptocurrency GlobalCoin. What’s interesting is that, over the past few months, the social media giant has been hard at work trying to win over financial institutions and tech companies – such as the Bank of England and crypto-firm Gemini – around formalizing an independent foundation – much like the Ethereum Foundation – to govern the digital asset. We know that the coin will most likely be a stablecoin i.e., pegged to a fiat currency / basket of currencies / or other, making it desirable and easily marketable in emerging markets where local fiat currencies are economically unstable – such as in Venezuela. The required funding will come from the fees Facebook charges partnering firms to run a node on the network. Essentially, these firms will need to stake their interest and commitment, and tie them into supporting the network. Facebook aims to have 100 nodes at the launch of GlobalCoin, with each node costing partnering firms as much as $10 million. Based on their tarnished reputation to safeguard the privacy and security of the social network’s users, we think this is ambitious to say the least.

Facebook is not the only tech firm embracing crypto with a suspect reputation. Just last week, the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) took legal action against social messaging app Kik – regarding its 2017 sale of one trillion “Kin” tokens to over 10,000 investors, raising around $100 million. The premise being that the sale was not registered with the SEC – a requirement under US securities laws. As such, the sale is deemed an “illegal securities offering of digital tokens.”

It is not only the SEC that are leading the fight against previous instances of cryptocurrency-powered crimes. The Joint Chiefs of Global Tax Enforcement or J5 - a team of five criminal intelligence communities from Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States whose purpose is to fight against international and transnational tax crime and money laundering. Currently, J5 has opened 60 different investigations specifically related to cryptocurrency-powered crimes. One of these is a Netherlands-based cryptocurrency “mixing service” called Bestmixer.io whose primary function was to hide the ownership history of cryptocurrencies, raking in 27,000 bitcoins ($200 million) over one year alone.

As many would consider the institutionalization of crypto by GAFA and the clamp down by global regulatory bodies a negative, its important to note that if adoption is key to ensuring the prosperity of these mechanisms, then such action needs to be taken to safeguard those vulnerable to exploitation and those that consider the inherent illicit activity too great a barrier to enter.

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