Offered large amount of ETH for my domain name from a company in Japan

sale
international
domain-name

#1

This is technically more of a tech scam question/concern than it is a crypo question, but wasn’t sure where to put it, and I trust the community here.

So I was emailed directly to purchase a domain name I own from a company in Japan. I’ve sold some of my domain names in the past through GoDaddy premium listings and a couple in small private domestic sales. Here’s the opening email (omitting amounts and domain name):

FROM: info@quicca.info
SUBJECT: [XX] ETH (Ethers) for ********.com

Hello!

Our client from Nagoya is interested in purchasing ******.com for a new online startup.

Do you have am Ethereum wallet?

Regards,


Vice President

Jun M***********

Quicca Hosting Inc.

TokyoJapan

quicca.com

Seems a bit scammy, but I replied back saying I was interested. Second reply the next day:

If you have Telegram you may contact our English speaking representative [First Name] at [Telegram Account]

If you don’t have Telegram just install it from Google Play or AppStore on your phone.

He may also help you to finish the sale. You may also send me your Telegram User name and he will contact you.

My commission is only 5 %. The commission is divided between you and the buyer and paid after you get the money.

The buyer offers [XX] ETH. If it’s ok let’s proceed. You will be paid Bitcoins/Ethereum, wire transfer or Western Union.

The payment to you will be made via escrow service to protect both parties during the transaction.

Do you have a certificate for your domain in English and Japanese? It’s required by the buyer and his escrow service. They must be sure your domain has no restrictions or problems with law and trademarks in Japan. He won’t proceed without it.

The certificate must include the following to be accepted by my buyer:

  • Trademark infringement verification (the buyer does not want to lose the domain after purchase because it has problems with trademarks).
  • The domain must not be pledged or sold to third parties (verification of restrictions).
  • The certificate must be up to date (issued during last 30 days)
  • Copy of the certificate in Japanese (required by the buyer because he does not speak English).
  • The certification agency must be authorized by my buyer and his bank.

We asked him if GoDaddy or Sedo appraisal certificates will work for him. Now we are awaiting for his answer.

I then began chatting with their “English Rep” on Telegram. Essentially, they said they need a Certificate from http://authorize-transaction.net/ to verify that there is no Trademark infringements in Japan, that the domain is owned by me and not promised in or transition to another party, etc. Which does makes sense to me. The process costs $259, and they claim that if the certificate doesn’t result in an offer within 15 days you can get a full refund.

Here are my concerns/thoughts:

  1. I had the domain name already listed in GoDaddy Premium listings. The offer I’m getting from the quicca.com Rep is many times more. I’m not sure if they don’t know about it, or just don’t want/can’t go thru the process on GoDaddy. I removed the premium listing for now.
  2. In my research I haven’t seen any scams related to quicca.com or quicca.info or authorize-transaction.net. Though there isn’t much info on the quicca hosting compan.
  3. I think it’s coincidence, but my email was hacked about 6-7 hours after I initially replied to the first email. They had changed the password, but I reset the password again and got the email account back. Anything important associated with it has 2-factor auth.
  4. I am 50/50 in feeling like this is generally a “too good to be true” thing…

What do you guys think?


#2

Presumably the scammers saw your domain listing on GoDaddy.


#3

Yeah… that was I thought I had too.


#4

if you get paid in crypto… that’s the best as there are no refunds for that. :slight_smile:


#5

@Mario does whois have your contact details or is it a private registration?


#6

@Blynker The registration is not private for this domain name, so it wouldn’t be hard to get some contact details for me.


#7

The Escrow site looks to be the scam. No SSL and only registered 12 days ago.
They take your crypto payment and that’s the last you hear of them.
Also just happens to provide everything that the “buyer” has asked for.


#8

Just got the same email!! Offered me 80 ethers too bad its a scam… Thanks for the post.


#9

@esclade22 well that was the same amount offered to me too, 80 ETH, so that kind confirms it as a scam for me.

Thanks!


#10

@Blynker right!! Definitely sounds like it’s just a fishnet…


#11

1: if it’s that much trouble…it’s a scam.
2: if it’s too easy…it’s a scam.
3: paid with Crypto via Western Union?.. wtf is that? It’s a scam.
4: if they have to explain such a simple process as to buy a domain name… it’s a scam
5: who the fuck buys domain names anymore?
It’s a scam
6: Go Daddy?? Really? Scam.
7: why do you care what his commission is?
Fuck that it’s a scam
8: Doesn’t know English? Gtfoh. It’s a scam.
9: $259. Wtf. Is. That. Why not $300? Why not $265? Fuck that it’s a scam.
10. They want access. It’s all they need. 100% Scam


#12

It “feels” pretty scammy to me.

And then there is the angle of them paying you much more than you have previously received. That reminds me of the Craigslist “For Sale” scams where the buyer immediately agrees to your asking price plus says he’ll tip you $100 more so that you’ll allow their pickup service to get the item from you before their payment to you has cleared (which it never does).


#13

This bit tells me it’s likely a scam. My suggestion, let them foot the due dilligence bill. If they want the domain for a large sum, they can certainly foot the $259 bill. Refusal to do so lends me to believe they’re the owners behind the certification site and are trying to catch you out on that $259, not the actual domain purchase. On the other hand, if they’re legit, they will have no problem paying you to do the do the certification process.

Regards,

Michael


#14

@mwlang @Peter_Rehm @VicAtNite Thanks for all the replies!

Pretty sure the consensus here is: SCAM. :upside_down_face:

Hopefully this will help someone else that gets a similar scammy offer, as @esclade22 confirmed in getting one as well.

Thanks everybody.


#15

Its a scam. they got me for the $260.


#16

i got taken by them for the $260


#17

OMG dude really? Anyone that offers to give you a large amount after spending a small amount whether its a sale or some sort of free thing its a scam. If someone is interested they will pay for the accreditation or documents they need themselves. That’s the way the world works.
I’m sorry for your loss hopefully that amount doesn’t hurt too much but ouch.


#18

Just to add to the “it’s a scam” chorus, but from a different angle.

I have a law degree and a lot of knowledge of trademark law and domain names. Admittedly, I know nothing about Japanese trademark law specifically, but a company that charges $259 for “trademark infringement verification” immediately sounds like a scam to me. Domain name trademark law is not nearly so cut and dried that there could be such a service. You were smart to post here before proceeding!


#19

I was made offer of 10 BTC. Because I’m new to this whole thing I’ve dragged it out, but have gotten further into it (scammed I believe) but not for the maximum. Has any heard about anyone actually getting paid? I should have checked this out earlier. I’m in a fortunate that this does not break the bank for us, but do feel like an idiot.


#20

any recourse? Ant reply from them?