Top ALTs to buy during capitulation


#101

I have heard the name, but didn’t further look into it. Polymath is definitely a gamble. Everyone assume that STOs are the thing of 2019, but will it really be?

Quote from Craig Wright:
“STOs Are Not New. They Decentralize Nothing”


#102

I wouldn’t put much weight into anything Craig says. lol

Plus not everything needs to be decentralized, especially when it deals with centralized real world assets. Sure, the ledger that keeps track should be decentralized, however the underlying assets do not. Craig is clearly missing the point… but then again, Craig is missing a lot of things (such as compassion, credibility, coherence, Satoshi’s private keys, etc). :rofl:

As for Polymath, based on my research, I’m finding that Own (CHX) and Dusk (DUSK) are much better options in terms of STO platforms.


#103

Okay. Last comment on this; think about how many coins would it take to successfully attack EOS vs how many coins would it take to successfully attack cardano as percentages of their entire coin supplies.


#104

I have zero interest in discussing this. Plus it’s a tangent that is hijacking the original topic. Lol

But attacking cardano is nearly impossible. You’d have to acquire the majority of the tokens or control the majority of the staking pools (there will be 1000). In order to own that many tokens you’d have to buy them, thus driving up the price astronomically. At that point you’d have no reason to sabotage your own holdings.

Anyway as I said, I have no interest in this discussion. Enjoy your EOS and let me enjoy my small ADA holding.


#105

I can’t believe that went over your head. enjoy your day dude!


#106

I didn’t mean to launch a Craig Wright discussion. Sorry. Although he is controversial, I do respect different opinions.

Back to the topic of this thread :sunglasses:


#107

Care to clarify then? :slight_smile:


#108

No need to apologize man!!


#109

EOS requires someone owning >~71% of all staked coins to attack it.
Cardano requires someone with >50% of all staked coins to attack it.


#110

No, EOS simply requires a few maliscious block producers to freeze the entire system.


#111

And cardano doesn’t?

EOS requires someone owning 71% of all coins. Cardano requires someone owning 50%. Whatever entities are malicious - there’ll need to be more of them EOS.


#112

No, unlike EOS, Cardano pool delegates have don’t have control over the system.

The large wallets that you mentioned are IOHK, Cardano Foundation, and Emurgo (the three entities behind Cardano). All crypto’s are centralized in the beginning but will lessen as the teams sell off to cover expenses. That being said, the top wallets don’t even come close to being 51%. They represent 22%… not 51%.

As for EOS, the attacking party doesn’t even need to own 51-70%. All you need is malicious block producers. So even once the tokens are evenly distributed, the entire system can be frozen by as few as 11 people. EOS may be one the most vulnerable projects out there, especially given that there’s already proof of cartels, vote bribing, etc.

Anyway, again, I’m done talking about this. Feel free to have the last word, as I’m done.

Edit: @7UP for some reason my post recorded as an edit, rather than a reply to your post below.


#113

I’m talking about coin holders. I couldn’t find any info on what % of ADA is staked, but assuming it’s about the same as EOS - the first 2 addresses in the richlist would be enough to attack it fully.

I like Dan’s analogy of cardano ‘a 400 pound bulletproof vest that doesn’t even stop bullets’


#114

I absolutely agree. I am accumulating XLM,XRP,TRX,MCO and LTC


#115

Definitely,OMG is big in Asia already. https://cointelegraph.com/news/omise-signs-agreement-with-major-south-korean-banking-affiliate-in-win-for-adoption

also https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KxCDX8ENfg

Counter argument

Definitely another overlooked or really just largely ignored one because ofthe actions ofCharlie Lee,meanwhile it’s making moves (UFC sponsor is an example) https://litecoin-foundation.org/litecoin-ufc/

Has this guy proven to be pretty accurate in the past?


#116

Cliff is half savant, half nut job.


#117

If you’re one step ahead people think that you’re a genius, but if you’re two or more steps ahead people just think you’re crazy. That happened to Clif and myself;-) So many people are Clif haters, I’ve seen him predict certain things that we’re totally impossible many times over the last 15 years. The predictions that he makes are independent of the timing and people don’t understand that. The process that Clif uses is what makes the timing independent, not his own decisions. I’ve seen him think that something was going to happen 2+ years before it happens and all of the surrounding events where exactly what he said they would be it just happened to be 2 years later than thought. Data mining aspects of the future through people’s perceptions is a pretty out their concept but today we even see elements of IARPA doing that except they’re using deep learning to do it instead of what Clif did before deep learning ever existed…


#118

All you need is malicious block producers.

All I need in Cardano is for the top block producers to be malicious. Why are you acting like that’s such a difference. No coin will ever be decentralized enough for someone to need to attack more than 15 entities and no coins has ever been that decentralized and it doesn’t matter because these coins have been running fine for years. I think that’s enough logic to show that 21 BPs is very decentralized in crypto terms.

top wallets don’t even come close to being 51%. They represent 22%… not 51%.

I don’t need anywhere near 51% of the coins to attack cardano. I probably need about 15%. Look at the richlist and count how many different entities I’d need to attack to get that amount :stuck_out_tongue:

The large wallets that you mentioned are IOHK, Cardano Foundation, and Emurgo

No they belong to Binance and a random


#119

Because they’re fundamentally different by design, to the point where what you’re saying is not possible. It’s clear that you have a fundamental misunderstanding of how PoS and dPoS variants differ, the role and authorities of “block producers” versus “pool delegates”, etc. These are NOT the same, they don’t work the same, and the methods in which the system can be compromised are not the same. The misconception is to the extent that what you just wrote actually doesn’t make any sense whatsoever when put in context of Cardano.

Now, for the fucking love of all things, can we please move on already?


#120

I am not talking about pool delegates. I am talking about people staking their coins from their own wallet. Read my reply again dude.